International Agreement To Limit Cfc Production

Under this agreement, CFCs, halons, carbon tetrachloride and methyl chloroform were completely terminated in 1996 in industrialized countries. In addition, methyl bromide consumption of methyl bromide has been limited to its 1991 level. For more information on the release of ODS, click here. Since the entry into force of the Montreal Protocol, atmospheric concentrations of major chlorofluorocarbons and related chlorinated hydrocarbons have either decreased or decreased. [43] Halon concentrations have continued to increase due to the release of halons currently stored in fire extinguishers, but their rate of increase has slowed and their frequency is expected to decrease by approximately 2020. Similarly, the concentration of HFCs has increased dramatically, at least in part, since for many applications (e.g. B as solvents or refrigerants), CFCs have been replaced by HFCs. While there have been reports of individual attempts to circumvent the ban, for example: Smuggling cfCs from undeveloped developed countries has achieved a high overall level of compliance. Statistical analyses from 2010 show a clearly positive signal from the Montreal Protocol to stratospheric ozone. [44] As a result, the Montreal Protocol has often been referred to as the most successful international environmental agreement to date.

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